Community Awareness Rallying to End Suicide
CDC RELEASES ALARMING SUICIDE STATISTICS, 1999-2017

December 6, 2018

Since 2008, suicide has ranked as the 10th leading cause of death for all ages in the United States. In 2016, suicide became the second leading cause of death for ages 10–34 and the fourth leading cause for ages 35–54. Although the Healthy People 2020 target is to reduce suicide rates to 10.2 per 100,000 by 2020, suicide rates have steadily increased in recent years . This data brief uses final mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) to update trends in suicide mortality from 1999 through 2017 and to describe differences by sex, age group, and urbanization level of the decedent’s county of residence.

This report highlights trends in suicide rates from 1999 through 2017. During this period, the age-adjusted suicide rate increased 33% from 10.5 per 100,000 in 1999 to 14.0 in 2017. The average annual percentage increase in rates accelerated from approximately 1% per year from 1999 through 2006 to 2% per year from 2006 through 2017. The age-adjusted rate of suicide among females increased from 4.0 per 100,000 in 1999 to 6.1 in 2017, while the rate for males increased from 17.8 to 22.4. Compared with rates in 1999, suicide rates in 2017 were higher for males and females in all age groups from 10 to 74 years. The differences in age-adjusted suicide rates between the most rural (noncore) and most urban (large central metro) counties was greater in 2017 than in 1999. In 1999, the age-adjusted suicide rate for the most rural counties (13.1 per 100,000) was 1.4 times the rate for the most urban counties (9.6), while in 2017, the age-adjusted suicide rate for the most rural counties (20.0) was 1.8 times the rate for the most urban counties (11.1). The age-adjusted suicide rate for the most urban counties in 2017 (11.1 per 100,000) was 16% higher than the rate in 1999 (9.6), while the rate for the most rural counties in 2017 (20.0) was 53% higher than the rate in 1999 (13.1). To see the complete data, visit this link at the CDC website.

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